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Child Custody Rights

By: Anna Martin - Updated: 24 Apr 2018 | comments*Discuss
 
Child Custody Residency Disputes Courts

In the UK child custody law determines who should be responsible for the care and charge of a child, after divorce or separation. The term custody is now more commonly referred to as residency - indicating where the children's main residence is, following a parental break up.

In the many cases, parents preference is for joint custody (or residency), which enables the child to spend an equal amount of time with each parent. This option also allows both parents to participate in any decision making which may affect the child. However, if parents are unable to decide amicably on what living arrangement is best for their child, the courts will decide on their behalf.

Parent Vs Parent

Most bitter disputes between married couples end up in the family courts. Whilst the separation and ensuing bitterness will undoubtedly affect the children it's important to remember that:
  • Most child residency court cases end amicably with either agreed residency or joint residency as the outcome
  • Access and maintenance payments from the non resident parent are also taken into consideration
  • In disputed cases each parent is individually assessed before a decision on which parent is given custody of the child, or children, is made

The best interests of the child is the general standard at the heart of all residency cases.

Joint Residency

Joint residency is considered to be the preferred solution as being in the best interests of most children.

BUT...there are no laws or 'rights' that state that a child should live specifically with either the mother or father.

Assuming you both have parental responsibility it is up to you to negotiate residency on the basis of what is best for the children. Many couples neglect to consider this fact and err on the side of what they themselves would prefer (or what suits them).

If you cannot come to an agreement, you should try mediation first. If that is unsuccessful, the courts will become involved and will issue a court order based on what it sees as appropriate.

Joint Residency Reflect Modern Society

The choice of joint residency, reflects the changes in society and takes into consideration work that mothers do outside of the home and a more hands-on approach of child care by fathers. By allowing both parents to have an equal share in the physical care of their child, or children, all legal rights connected to responsibilities and obligations to children are divided.

Custody Disputes

Most custody disputes involve the child’s mother and father. However, in some cases a third party – a grandparent, for instance – may seek custody at the time of a parent’s death or incapacity. If a couple has never married - making provisions for the care of their child may also develop into a dispute. Generally though a court will accept that a parent is in the best position to maintain the welfare of their child.

Unusual Circumstances

In some rare circumstances one parent may be permanently excluded from having any access to their child. However, the court has the right to change the decision at any point in time, should the parent’s circumstances change. The parent is able to re-apply for access at any time, and once an application is made the court may reconsider arrangements after examining evidence.

The Court Decides

The courts will generally accept custody arrangements that parents submit as part of their separation agreement. To ensure these arrangements serve the child’s interests the courts will review the plan. The role that grandparents, step-parents and other influential adults play in the child’s life may also be taken into consideration by the courts.

Changing Or Regaining Custody

Changing a child’s residency arrangements is possible. In order to support the change, substantial evidence of the stability the child will need to be submitted. There are many other factors to consider, which may include relocation of a parent, stability of employment, integration of the child into the new environment etc.

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D - Your Question:
My husband and I would like to get main residencial custody of my stepson. His mother has had violent relationships in the past and issues with depression that caused child neglect (social services were involved both times) 3 years since the last major incident. He is failing at school because she doesn't invest any time into his education, he has tummy issues through suspected poor diet, he is in the care of a childminder most of the week, he is not shielded from any of her adult problems as he should be, and has very little in terms of family or social network from her side for support. She is financially unstable and very volatile which results in her regularly deciding to make contact difficult for us which my 6 year old stepson also finds difficult. We have a stable family home, lots of family support, stable finances and his little sister is due to be born soon too. I know we can give him so much more and put him in a better school. We have kept a log of everything we have done with/for him and every issue we have seen from her side including messages, photos, and logs of conversations with school. How much chance do you think we would have of winning full residential custody? At the moment she only let's us see him fortnightly and we sometimes have to fight for even that. We want her to have regular contact at weekends and holidays but due to the distance, joint custody is not an option. It would mean his main home changing to ours instead of hers and a change in school too. Any advice would be hugely appreciated.

Our Response:
It's rare that a court will hand a child to another parent, unless absolutely necessary. The upbringing of your stepson may not be ideal, but unless there was a very good and provable reason why the child should be removed from the caring parent then the court is unlikely to act. If there has been no incident for three years, then the court may have no reason to push to make any changes. In addition, if your husband only has limited access, then the court will decide upon what is in the child's best interests and stability and consistency are important. Even though you may feel the child's life is not stable, to remove him from his mother and hand him to the other parent would cause even more instability for the child. Your husband may wish to seek legal advice if he feels he has a case.
ChildSupportLaws - 26-Apr-18 @ 1:56 PM
My husband and I would like to get main residencial custody of my stepson. His mother has had violent relationships in the past and issues with depression that caused child neglect (social services were involved both times) 3 years since the last major incident. He is failing at school because she doesn't invest any time into his education, he has tummy issues through suspected poor diet, he is in the care of a childminder most of the week, he is not shielded from any of her adult problems as he should be, and has very little in terms of family or social network from her side for support. She is financially unstable and very volatile which results in her regularly deciding to make contact difficult for us which my 6 year old stepson also finds difficult. We have a stable family home, lots of family support, stable finances and his little sister is due to be born soon too. I know we can give him so much more and put him in a better school. We have kept a log of everything we have done with/for him and every issue we have seen from her side including messages, photos, and logs of conversations with school. How much chance do you think we would have of winning full residential custody? At the moment she only let's us see him fortnightly and we sometimes have to fight for even that. We want her to have regular contact at weekends and holidays but due to the distance, joint custody is not an option. It would mean his main home changing to ours instead of hers and a change in school too. Any advice would be hugely appreciated.
D - 24-Apr-18 @ 7:37 PM
Ks - Your Question:
In need of advice im a father to 2/3 children the third I have helped raise since he was 2 now 12 I have asked for pr for the eldest since seperating from his mother for 2 yrs his real farther has agreed yet she has not. The other two children spend 3/7nights with me plus I have a few hours on tues and thurs. My ex gets very spitful that I have a new partner whch the kids enjoy being around and have since been staying with me and my partner in my tme wth the kids. How ever when we seperated I was forced out of the home due to the army. Reason for the seperationg was that she cheated on me. Had I nt been in the army quarter I would of just booted her out the house and I would have residency would I have a chance in court to get the residency. I velieve I can offer the kost to the children. The ex is always complaining that she doesnt get enough money off my for the three children even tho I pay double what csa require me to pay. Just Need some direction on what I can do.

Our Response:
If your question is relating to asking for child residency of your children, this is highly unlikely unless there is a very good reason such as proven neglect or abuse.The court will not punish your ex by giving you residency of your children for being unfaithful. Neither will a court hand over children from one parent to another for no reason (it places stability and consistency as being of high importance). You can only gain PR of your eldest, if your ex agrees. However, you may be able to gain access through the courts if you have brought the child up and you have been consistent in your eldest's life. As in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the child in question. The court will always put the child’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order.
ChildSupportLaws - 24-Apr-18 @ 3:17 PM
Hannah - Your Question:
How would I go about getting full custody of my child? Her dad chose to leave, We arranged he can see her whenever he likes. but he doesn’t show up we sit in all day waiting and my daughter crying at the window for him, he chose his new girlfriend over her so many times and brakes promises to her, her behaviour gets much worse when she has contact with him. He has mental issues and criminal record along with assaulting me infront of her. my daughter will cry if he comes near me now. She screams for me when she goes with him. him and his family have a drug issue.

Our Response:
As long as there is no court order to say the father has to see your child, you can refuse access on the basis of his previous track record and inconsistency (which is having an effect on your daughter). If your ex wishes to challenge this, then he can suggest mediation or (if you refuse to attend mediation) he can apply to court. As in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the child in question. The court will always put the child’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order.
ChildSupportLaws - 24-Apr-18 @ 12:55 PM
In need of advice im a father to 2/3 children the third i have helped raise since he was 2 now 12 i have asked for pr for the eldest since seperating from his mother for 2 yrs his real farther has agreed yet she has not. The other two children spend 3/7nights with me plus i have a few hours on tues and thurs. My ex gets very spitful that i have a new partner whch the kids enjoy being around and have since been staying with me and my partner in my tme wth the kids. How ever when we seperated i was forced out of the home due to the army. Reason for the seperationg was that she cheated on me. Had i nt been in the army quarter i would of just booted her out the house and i would have residency would i have a chance in court to get the residency. I velieve i can offer the kost to the children. The ex is always complaining that she doesnt get enough money off my for the three children even tho i pay double what csa require me to pay. Just Need some direction on what i can do.
Ks - 24-Apr-18 @ 7:35 AM
How would I go about getting full custody of my child? Her dad chose to leave, We arranged he can see her whenever he likes.. but he doesn’t show up we sit in all day waiting and my daughter crying at the window for him, he chose his new girlfriend over her so many times and brakes promises to her, her behaviour gets much worsewhen she has contact with him. He has mental issues and criminal record along with assaulting me infront of her.. my daughter will cry if he comes near me now.She screams for me when she goes with him... him and his family have a drug issue.
Hannah - 23-Apr-18 @ 10:14 PM
Ulcia1985 - Your Question:
Hi. Me and my partner split up 7 months ago and we share custody over our 6 years old boy. My ex is really good dad and wants to be involved in our sons life all the time. I think its great but recently we cant agree on quite a few things. Currently my son stays one night with me one with his dad. Then every other weekend.I dont think its a good idea but my ex refuses to change anything until we see specialist. My son seems to be ok with that but im worried that it will affect him later.I wonder if there is place where I can get advice for free. Do not know what to do anymore.Thank you

Our Response:
There is no rule book to parenting and therefore it is difficult to say whether your son will be affected by the arrangement or not. Kids are pretty flexible and if they know they are loved by both parents they respond pretty well to change and soon get accustomed to any arrangement.
ChildSupportLaws - 20-Apr-18 @ 2:37 PM
Nicole - Your Question:
Hello so im looking for somr advice me and my sons dad have been split for 4 year now recently I went to lawyers so he could only have him every second saturday because he doesn't put his son first thats why I made the arrangment now I want full custody because I dont feel like hes looking after my son properly hes been giving him irn bru sweeties chocolate all day when he has him hes up until half 11 night time lying in bed with his dad watching his mobile phone now I have my son in a routine he doesnt get and juice at all only water milk or diluting juice he is in bed for 8 o clock every night when I get him back from his dads hes up until 12 midnight so my routing is out the window basically so I have to keep doing it again and again I just want to no if I take him to court what will happen thanks

Our Response:
You would have to attend mediation before being able to apply to court, please see link here.
ChildSupportLaws - 20-Apr-18 @ 12:18 PM
RL - Your Question:
Me and my partner have split up and as of yet no agreement has been made, I believe my ex is mentally unstable and would have a hard time trusting him with her alone, he has already said he doesn't want anything to do with her until a DNA test is done (even though she is his double) he then phoned me the following day to day he was mad that's why he said it. He has a history of violence, drugs, theft which is all on his criminal record. He is mentally abusive towards me and has been physically abusive towards me aswell. He walked out of his child's life and made no effort to come and see her, he is now saying he will go through court to see her, what are my options.

Our Response:
If you cannot agree between you as parents, then mediation is the next option and court the final option where parents cannot agree. Please see link here . If your ex has a proven history of violence and a criminal record, then this will be taken into consideration as will your daughter's preference regarding whether she wishes to see her father or not. However, your ex does have a right to apply for access to see his child. As in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the child in question. The court will always put the child’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order.
ChildSupportLaws - 19-Apr-18 @ 2:00 PM
Me and my partner have split up and as of yet no agreement has been made, I believe my ex is mentally unstable and would have a hard time trusting him with her alone, he has already said he doesn't want anything to do with her until a DNA test is done (even though she is his double) he then phoned me the following day to day he was mad that's why he said it. He has a history of violence, drugs, theft which is all on his criminal record. He is mentally abusive towards me and has been physically abusive towards me aswell. He walked out of his child's life and made no effort to come and see her, he is now saying he will go through court to see her, what are my options.
RL - 17-Apr-18 @ 4:52 PM
Hi. Me and my partner split up 7 months ago and we share custody over our 6 years old boy. My ex is really good dad and wants to be involved in our sons life all the time. I think its great but recently we cant agree on quite a few things. Currently my son stays one night with me one with his dad. Then every other weekend. I dont think its a good idea but my ex refuses to change anything until we see specialist. My son seems to be ok with that but im worried that it will affect him later.I wonder if there is place where i can get advice for free. Do not know what to do anymore. Thank you
Ulcia1985 - 17-Apr-18 @ 10:34 AM
Bail14 - Your Question:
My partner and I have been separated for over a year, we have a well established visitation arrangement set up and our little boy is very settled, we agreed this between ourselves, we both have PR for our child. However, my issue is that my ex husband plans to move his brother into his house. I have concerns about my ex brother-in-laws behaviour and would genuinely feel concerned leaving my child in the same house as him. Do I have any rights to stop this from happening? Is there anything I can do? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks

Our Response:
Mutual negotiation is needed here, so that you can attempt to resolve your concerns between you. If your ex is not responsive to your concerns and you don't trust him not to put your child in a possibly dangerous situation, then mediation may be an option for you to consider suggesting.
ChildSupportLaws - 10-Apr-18 @ 2:21 PM
Sid - Your Question:
Me and my partner split up 2 weeks ago. When 7 months pregnant she had a serious infection which caused her to have extensive surgery to her favoured arm. She has also been left with mobility problems in her knees which means she struggles to get around. This left me as doing most of the childcare as well as caring for her, cooking all the meals for us and her other 2 sons, cutting up her food etc. I was told to leave in the middle of the night and slept in my car. I went to get some clothes the next day and went in to see my daughter, I picked her up and walked out with her but had nowhere to go and also quickly realised it was the wrong thing to do and handed her back to her mother. Since then though I have tried to get her to let me see my little girl but she refuses, I have written a parenting plan which she has ignored. I am trying everything telling her I will see her anywhere with anyone just so I can see her. However if this was to go to court would they take into account that I have been the primary carer and will the stupid decision I made to walk out the door with her count against me?

Our Response:
In the first instance, you would have to suggest mediation, please see link here. If your ex refuses, you would have to contemplate applying to court. As in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the child in question. The court will always put the child’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order. If you have been the primary carer, then this will not go against you. Each parent with parental responsibility (i.e you're named as the father on the birth certificate) has the right to look after/care for/make decisions regarding their child.
ChildSupportLaws - 9-Apr-18 @ 11:24 AM
Hello so im looking for somr advice me and my sons dad have been split for 4 year now recently i went to lawyers so he could only have him every second saturday because he doesn't put his son first thats why i made the arrangment now i want full custody because i dont feel like hes looking after my son properly hes been giving him irn bru sweeties chocolate all day when he has him hes up until half 11 night time lying in bed with his dad watching his mobile phone now i have my son in a routine he doesnt get and juice at all only water milk or diluting juice he is in bed for 8 o clock every night when i get him back from his dads hes up until 12 midnight so my routing is out the window basically so i have to keep doing it again and again i just want to no if i take him to court what will happen thanks
Nicole - 8-Apr-18 @ 9:33 PM
Me and my partner split up 2 weeks ago. When 7 months pregnant she had a serious infection which caused her to have extensive surgery to her favoured arm. She has also been left with mobility problems in her knees which means she struggles to get around. This left me as doing most of the childcare as well as caring for her, cooking all the meals for us and her other 2 sons, cutting up her food etc. I was told to leave in the middle of the night and slept in my car. I went to get some clothes the next day and went in to see my daughter, I picked her up and walked out with her but had nowhere to go and also quickly realised it was the wrong thing to do and handed her back to her mother. Since then though I have tried to get her to let me see my little girl but she refuses, I have written a parenting plan which she has ignored. I am trying everything telling her I will see her anywhere with anyone just so I can see her. However if this was to go to court would they take into account that I have been the primary carer and will the stupid decision I made to walk out the door with her count against me?
Sid - 8-Apr-18 @ 3:03 PM
Since our first daughter was born 3 and half years ago our marriage has been gradually getting only worse. another daughter was born almost a year ago but unfortunately no improvement but regression in our marriage has occurred. My husband quit work when our first daughter was 1 year old. He wanted to take a break from work and I didn't resist, however I returned back to work for only 3 days a week. All our expenses had been covered by mainly my salary and more recently my maternity pay. I have to return back to work any time soon however my husband shows no interest (although saying that he wants but no action) going back to work. I'm worried that he is planning a divorce once I return back to work but he stays at home to look after our daughters. To be perfectly honest it would be safer for our daughters to be looked after in nursery than my husband but high costs is an issue. During our arguments he had said a few times that he will request 50/50 custody and that will allow him to do with our daughters everything he wants. He is unfortunately often very careless and doesn't take many health and safety related things seriously enough. For example, often likes giving a hazardous and/ or small items to chew on to our baby girl which I couple of times have managed to take out of her mouth and prevent chocking only in the last minute etc. My question is if a father stays at home to look after children during my work days will it increase his chances of getting 50/50 custody? Would it be different if daughters went to nursery instead?Thanks!
Elisa - 7-Apr-18 @ 8:11 AM
My partner and I have been separated for over a year, we have a well established visitation arrangement set up and our little boy is very settled, we agreed this between ourselves, we both have PR for our child. However, my issue is that my ex husband plans to move his brother into his house. I have concerns about my ex brother-in-laws behaviour and would genuinely feel concerned leaving my child in the same house as him.Do I have any rights to stop this from happening? Is there anything I can do? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks
Bail14 - 7-Apr-18 @ 2:26 AM
Sarah - Your Question:
My child is 14 weeks old, I am unsure about the relationship I am in and wonder when the best time to break up would be. Currently we all live in my house and both have parental responsibility. If we broke up my partner would move back to his hometown which is 45 miles away. Am I right in thinking when my child is in school would give me a better case to keep residency?

Our Response:
Generally speaking, the parent who is the day-to-day primary carer of your child has a better chance of gaining residency (if the matter went to court). However, mutual agreement with your partner and mediation are the first options to consider. Court is always viewed as the very last resort.
ChildSupportLaws - 6-Apr-18 @ 2:46 PM
Mini - Your Question:
My partner has an 9 year old son. Him and his ex had a court order in place for my partner to see his son. This happened because she stopped us seeing him out of spite a few years ago. My partner has recently got jailed unexpectedly. She has cut all contact. Does my partner have rights in jail to see his son or even our kids (his brothers) to see him. Shes asked for legal aid to apply for my partner to get 0 contact. He will be out in a few months and he will just apply for legal aid to see him again. It upsets me because the little boys head will be so messed up from things that has happened over the years. She promised is this would not happen ever again for the wee boys sake, my partner warned her before he got jailed this might be happening (no one thought it would have because hes not in fault). She promised us she would stick to the agreement.

Our Response:
If there is a variation to the court order i.e your partner going into prison, then it could be construed your ex has a valid reason to breach the court order. If his ex continues to not allow access when your partner comes out of prison, your partner would have to refer the matter back to court.
ChildSupportLaws - 5-Apr-18 @ 12:25 PM
My partner has an 9 year old son. Him and his ex had a court order in place for my partner to see his son. This happened because she stopped us seeing him out of spite a few years ago. My partner has recently got jailed unexpectedly. She has cut all contact. Does my partner have rights in jail to see his son or even our kids (his brothers) to see him. Shes asked for legal aid to apply for my partner to get 0 contact. He will be out in a few months and he will just apply for legal aid to see him again. It upsets me because the little boys head will be so messed up from things that has happened over the years. She promised is this would not happen ever again for the wee boys sake, my partner warned her before he got jailed this might be happening (no one thought it would have because hes not in fault). She promised us she would stick to the agreement.
Mini - 3-Apr-18 @ 8:34 PM
My child is 14 weeks old, I am unsure about the relationship I am in and wonder when the best time to break up would be. Currently we all live in my house and both have parental responsibility. If we broke up my partner would move back to his hometown which is 45 miles away. Am I right in thinking when my child is in school would give me a better case to keep residency?
Sarah - 30-Mar-18 @ 6:08 PM
My son's mother was diagnosed with bipolar affective disorder and was hospitalised last September under section of the mental health act and then under section 3 of the same act in October of last year just yet he was born, social services stated that she was not to be left alone with him and unable to be his primary care giver due to neglect. She has been pushing for him to move to South Africa to stay with his grandparents over there, from that point onwards and my son's social worker has supported this option and even stated that she has more rights than I do as she is the mother, going so far as to state that she could end back up in hospital so that they could first asses her before they even considered me. He is currently with his grandparents in South Africa and I am just wondering if I am still able to pursue custody of my son even if he is not in the UK and what I can do exactly.
Trop - 29-Mar-18 @ 3:29 PM
Brun - Your Question:
My child's father is due to relocate and has unlimited access at present. He has PR (named on birth certificate). My question is what is the likelihood of a court allowing son to relocate with him to new school, new area no immediate family etc. It has been mentioned in "passing" and my reply was this is not in the best interests of our son when he is settled at school etc

Our Response:
Primary care for a child usually goes to the day-to-day current primary carer of the child (in most instances, the mother).Also, a court would be more reluctant to choose to uproot a child from the child's school, family and friends, or hand a child over to the person who is not the primary carer. There has to be a good reason for a court to choose this option. As in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the child in question. The court will always put the child’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order.
ChildSupportLaws - 29-Mar-18 @ 11:44 AM
AT - Your Question:
My husband and I have separated for over 2 years now. We both have parental responsibility. We have 3 children (9,6,4) and they stay over his place most weekends. Initially, I thought that having joint custody would be the best for our children. However, I get worried when he says he wants to take them on week long breaks abroad. He is Irish and his family is in Ireland, I do not want him to take the children to Ireland or on lengthy breaks away as I do not believe he can care for them appropriately. My reason is that every time the children return home, they are unwell and the last trip my daughter broke her arm falling off trampoline. How do I prevent him from taking them away on holidays? Do I need to have full custody in order to do this?Please advise as this topic will need to be discussed as the holidays are approaching. Thanks.

Our Response:
You have the Parental Responsibility to say no. However, your children's father also has the PR to challenge your decision. Any issues that cannot be resolved between yourselves should be negotiated through mediation. If mediation fails, or one parent refuses to attend/comply, the next options and last resort is court. As in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the children in question. The court will always put the children’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order.
ChildSupportLaws - 29-Mar-18 @ 10:52 AM
Stu - Your Question:
My wife left me over a yr ago we have a 5yr old and a 2yr old she willingly let me have them she sees them a few hrs a day a week she has a new man in her life shows no interest in the boys at all. I want to go live in Scotland a new start for myself and the boys one min she says ok go ahead the next she says I can’t take them can you give me some idea of where I stand. Thank you

Our Response:
If your ex (who has Parental Responsibility) refuses to give her consent, you would have to apply to court. As in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the children in question. The court will always put the children’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order.
ChildSupportLaws - 29-Mar-18 @ 9:54 AM
My wife left me over a yr ago we have a 5yr old and a 2yr old she willingly let me have them she sees them a few hrs a day a week she has a new man in her life shows no interest in the boys at all . I want to go live in Scotlanda new start for myself and the boys one min she says ok go ahead the next she says I can’t take them can you give me some idea of where I stand . Thank you
Stu - 28-Mar-18 @ 5:26 PM
My husband and I have separated for over 2 years now.We both have parental responsibility.We have 3 children (9,6,4) and they stay over his place most weekends.Initially, I thought that having joint custody would be the best for our children.However, I get worried when he says he wants to take them on week long breaks abroad.He is Irish and his family is in Ireland, I do not want him to take the children to Ireland or on lengthy breaks away as I do not believe he can care for them appropriately. My reason is that every time the children return home, they are unwell and the last trip my daughter broke her arm falling off trampoline.How do I prevent him from taking them away on holidays? Do I need to have full custody in order to do this? Please advise as this topic will need to be discussed as the holidays are approaching. Thanks.
AT - 28-Mar-18 @ 12:46 PM
My child's father is due to relocate and has unlimited access at present. He has PR (named on birth certificate). My question is what is the likelihood of a court allowing son to relocate with him to new school, new area no immediate family etc. It has been mentioned in "passing" and my reply was this is not in the best interests of our son when he is settled at school etc
Brun - 28-Mar-18 @ 7:44 AM
What is the minimum legal age to take custody of a child?
Fred - 27-Mar-18 @ 3:55 PM
Shelly - Your Question:
I have a 14 year old son ive not been with hus dad in several years lately he has been staying with his dad a lot more but has got out of hand started smoking hanging round with the wrong people missing school etc and is saying he wants to stay at his dads half share kind of thing what rights do I have I want him home to get him sorted there has never been any custody case a e separated and my son lived with me im at the end of my tether with worry

Our Response:
The first person you need to try to resolve this issue is with your son's father (if you can). If you cannot, then you would have to suggest mediation. If your ex doesn't support you, you would have the option to apply to court. However, much depends upon whether you wish to pursue this route. The problems come as children become older and more determined regarding what they wish to do.
ChildSupportLaws - 27-Mar-18 @ 11:05 AM
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    Re: Can I Get Back Pay for Child Maintenance?
    Sl - Your Question:My husband has been paying through collect and pay for years but recently got a new job and…
    26 April 2018
  • ChildSupportLaws
    Re: What Happens When the CSA/CMS Gets it Wrong?
    Smithy - Your Question:Hi , I earn 1300 a month and am currently paying £435 a month csa although I agree I…
    26 April 2018
  • Smithy
    Re: What Happens When the CSA/CMS Gets it Wrong?
    Hi , I earn 1300 a month and am currently paying £435 a month csa although I agree I should pay towards my…
    25 April 2018
  • Hal
    Re: How Much Will I Have To Pay?
    Hi. Am I right in thinking. The csa (or new one) do not take childcare costs into consideration when factoring how much…
    24 April 2018
  • Kirsty
    Re: What Happens When the CSA/CMS Gets it Wrong?
    Hi there, I'm wondering if anyone can give me advice on obtaining my full case notes from the CSA. I'm hoping…
    24 April 2018
  • ezzmo
    Re: Shared Care of a Child
    Hi my partner has been paying child support for past 3 years. He has the children (now aged 15) twice a week or whenever they ask to come.…
    24 April 2018
  • ChildSupportLaws
    Re: Child Custody Rights
    Ks - Your Question:In need of advice im a father to 2/3 children the third I have helped raise since he was 2 now 12 I have asked for pr for…
    24 April 2018
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