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Child Custody Rights

By: Anna Martin - Updated: 20 Sep 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Child Custody Residency Disputes Courts

In the UK child custody law determines who should be responsible for the care and charge of a child, after divorce or separation. The term custody is now more commonly referred to as residency - indicating where the children's main residence is, following a parental break up.

In the many cases, parents preference is for joint custody (or residency), which enables the child to spend an equal amount of time with each parent. This option also allows both parents to participate in any decision making which may affect the child. However, if parents are unable to decide amicably on what living arrangement is best for their child, the courts will decide on their behalf.

Parent Vs Parent

Most bitter disputes between married couples end up in the family courts. Whilst the separation and ensuing bitterness will undoubtedly affect the children it's important to remember that:
  • Most child residency court cases end amicably with either agreed residency or joint residency as the outcome
  • Access and maintenance payments from the non resident parent are also taken into consideration
  • In disputed cases each parent is individually assessed before a decision on which parent is given custody of the child, or children, is made

The best interests of the child is the general standard at the heart of all residency cases.

Joint Residency

Joint residency is considered to be the preferred solution as being in the best interests of most children.

BUT...there are no laws or 'rights' that state that a child should live specifically with either the mother or father.

Assuming you both have parental responsibility it is up to you to negotiate residency on the basis of what is best for the children. Many couples neglect to consider this fact and err on the side of what they themselves would prefer (or what suits them).

If you cannot come to an agreement, you should try mediation first. If that is unsuccessful, the courts will become involved and will issue a court order based on what it sees as appropriate.

Joint Residency Reflect Modern Society

The choice of joint residency, reflects the changes in society and takes into consideration work that mothers do outside of the home and a more hands-on approach of child care by fathers. By allowing both parents to have an equal share in the physical care of their child, or children, all legal rights connected to responsibilities and obligations to children are divided.

Custody Disputes

Most custody disputes involve the child’s mother and father. However, in some cases a third party – a grandparent, for instance – may seek custody at the time of a parent’s death or incapacity. If a couple has never married - making provisions for the care of their child may also develop into a dispute. Generally though a court will accept that a parent is in the best position to maintain the welfare of their child.

Unusual Circumstances

In some rare circumstances one parent may be permanently excluded from having any access to their child. However, the court has the right to change the decision at any point in time, should the parent’s circumstances change. The parent is able to re-apply for access at any time, and once an application is made the court may reconsider arrangements after examining evidence.

The Court Decides

The courts will generally accept custody arrangements that parents submit as part of their separation agreement. To ensure these arrangements serve the child’s interests the courts will review the plan. The role that grandparents, step-parents and other influential adults play in the child’s life may also be taken into consideration by the courts.

Changing Or Regaining Custody

Changing a child’s residency arrangements is possible. In order to support the change, substantial evidence of the stability the child will need to be submitted. There are many other factors to consider, which may include relocation of a parent, stability of employment, integration of the child into the new environment etc.

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Hi. I have a 8 year son who I see as much as I can 3 to 5 hours on Monday’s Wednesday’s friday’s and he also stay’s at mine every other Saturday i want to know what rights do I have to my son as I want full residency of him. He mother doesn’t do much for him she pretty much stay on her bed awake reading books or stories on her iPad or playing games on a console and takes him out maybe once a month or every 2 months that’s it she has a husband who she been married to for a few years now and he pretty much does all the cleaning cooking taking and picking up the kids from school she also has 4 other children 3 Boys Ages are 12 and twins 10 and a daughter that is 4. My son older brother have been bullying him from when he was 1 years old either taking toys away to biteing him and it more of the mental bullying saying why are you here your not part of this family you should do us all a favour and just kill your self stuff like that... now my son is a bit of a bully him self to he brothers and he will attack them for no reason sometimes.. when my son is with me when we are out or staying at my place this act of aggression does not exist when I am with him at he mums place it there he will argue with anyone he does not pay attention to anyone most of the times a lot of the time you have to rise your voice at him just for him to say what or what do you want I want my son to have a better life than the whole situation he is in now ... any type of info or help will be much appreciated
Rkt1284 - 20-Sep-17 @ 2:13 PM
Hello. I have 10 year old child with an ex partner that lives in uk. I myself live in another European country. We moved here when the baby was 6 months old. Father has not been much a part of his life . also, has not been supporting him financially ( only a few years with 100£ per month). Last year the father was convicted as a paedo ( suspended sentence). I have cut offall contact. I wish to have full custody since my child is now travelling abroad more with the family and also with different sports tournaments. His father is only a name on the birth certificate. I have been scared to file for sole custody but I feel the time has come. How should I approach this? As I understand, if done through court, the process should take place in the country that the child is living in?
north - 20-Sep-17 @ 12:39 PM
hi I have a 13 year old daughter who has lived with me all her life, a while ago she sent pics of herself an i was horrified as I have always taught her to respect herself I had to go to her school an I got in touch with the police an phoned for a social worker to see if they could get threw to her an make sence of what she had done ...... the police took months to get her gadgets to have a look threw an the social worker was not much help as all of a sudden my daughter came up with she wanted to go live with her dad an change schools the social worker said this was ok I couldn't get my head round it all an was so hurt buy my daughters decision as I have done every thing for her an she had a stabble life an when ever she wanted to see her dad she could now she is playing me only coming ver when she thinks shes getting something or letting me down when shes surposed to come I want her to be happy but I still think she should have structure an stability her dad works all hours an lives with his parents so I don't think shes getting what she needs from him how cani make it so she has to stick to our days an nights
lou lou - 20-Sep-17 @ 8:27 AM
My partner and I split during pregnancy my baby is now 2 weeks old our other daughter is 4...he has her 2 nights a week but doesn't take her to nursery she's now losing her place due to so many absences because he can't get up in mornings, she has no routine or structure with him as he lives at his mum's house some days and the rest he goes between a hotel, and his grans house, he has no job and he now wants to fight to take the newborn overnight he hasn't as much as a blanket never mind bottles or anything a newborn needs but I've to provide this as I'm the mother and it's my duty to make sure he gets time with her...i put on a smile and let him have visits with the baby but he doesn't make the effort to show up because their too early for him....what are my rights, can I stop my daughter's from staying overnight with him until he has some sort of structure in his life for them...my 4 year old suffers terribly as do I because she's tired irritable and moody when she returns...theres routine at our home.
nats - 19-Sep-17 @ 10:31 AM
Newdad82 - Your Question:
I am British, my partner is EU citizen. We have a baby who is 6 months old. Recently my partner has told me she wants to go back to eu family and has no date to come back. I am concerned if she decides she wants to live permanently away ffrom on uk as my work is here. What are my rights as dad of baby

Our Response:
Your partner has to request your consent (if you have parental responsibility) if she wishes to take your child abroad, please see link here . If you refuse, your partner will have to apply to court for permission. The court will then decide what it thinks is in the best interests of your child. If you fear your ex may attempt to take your child out of the country without your consent, then you can apply for aProhibited Steps Order (PSO). A PSO, is an order granted by the court in family cases which prevents either parent from carrying out certain events or making specific trips with their children without the express permission of the other parent. This is more common in cases where there is suspicion that one parent may leave the area with their children. If your partner takes your child abroad without your consent, this is classed as abduction. However, it can be extremely difficult for the other parent to get their child back. This is one of the scenarios that a PSO seeks to prevent. As in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the child in question. The court will always put the child’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order. You may wish to seek legal advice in order to explore your options fully.
ChildSupportLaws - 18-Sep-17 @ 2:54 PM
Sparks - Your Question:
Hi my sister and her partner split up over 2 years ago and he will only allow her to have her on a Thursday and a Sunday night, mediation has been attempted but he is so stubborn the mediator told my sister it was a waste of time any suggestions cheers

Our Response:
If mediation fails and one parent remains dissatisfied with the arrangement, then that particular parent would have to apply to court for the court to decide. As in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the children in question. The court will always put the children’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order.
ChildSupportLaws - 18-Sep-17 @ 12:34 PM
Anon - Your Question:
AdviceMe and my partner have a one year old daughter. My partner told me when pregnant he was unhappy but we tried to see if things would get back on track which unfortunately they haven't. I have therefore made the decision to leave which I haven't yet done as my family live 300 miles away. I just want to know my rights before I make the move? I would never stop him from seeing our daughter

Our Response:
If you are moving 300 miles away and your partner has parental responsibility of your child (i.e is registered on the birth certificate), then by law, you would have to ask his consent to move and if he refuses apply to court. Some parents will move anyway and risk being taken to court. Mediation is a good way of trying to iron out the issues if you can't agree between yourselves. Negotiation and talking through the matter in order to come to a workable arrangement is key here.
ChildSupportLaws - 18-Sep-17 @ 11:36 AM
I am British, my partner is EU citizen. We have a baby who is 6 months old. Recently my partner has told me she wants to go back to eu family and has no date to come back. I am concerned if she decides she wants to live permanently away ffrom on uk as my work is here. What are my rights as dad of baby
Newdad82 - 17-Sep-17 @ 2:33 PM
Please help. I have been split with the father of my child for 9 months, and he has completely disregarded our daughter. No birthday present, minimal contact of only 4 hours a week if not less, which he would spend texting on his mobile, no maintenance for 6 months now, CSM are involved now and started last friday, and still no payment recieved. When I contacted him regarding the maintenance he told me I have to wait a further two weeks. There has been no effort from himself to see our daughter or check on her well-being, his mother done this for a few weeks but that too has also stopped. He has emotionally abused our daughter by telling her that I was 'dangerous' and a 'c**t' whilst leaving her to stand on a windw ceil whilst he was face-timing a friend laying on the sofa. I dont believe he woud ever physically harm our daughter, but if he can emotionally abuse her by speaking ill-mannered of her mother, what else does he/can he say to/around her. Do I have anywhere to stand for full custody with supervised visititation rights?
bones - 16-Sep-17 @ 8:11 PM
Hi my sister and her partner split up over 2 years ago and he will only allow her to have her on a Thursday and a Sunday night, mediation has been attempted but he is so stubborn the mediator told my sister it was a waste of time any suggestions cheers
Sparks - 15-Sep-17 @ 5:11 PM
Advice Me and my partner have a one year old daughter. My partner told me when pregnant he was unhappy but we tried to see if things would get back on track which unfortunately they haven't. I have therefore made the decision to leave which I haven't yet done as my family live 300 miles away. I just want to know my rights before I make the move? I would never stop him from seeing our daughter
Anon - 15-Sep-17 @ 3:36 PM
@mr p - the problem might stem from the fact that as grandparents you do not have parental responsibility and cannot apply for it. Therefore, the courts will not agree to shared care of the children. You don't need official permission from the courts if your daughter agrees for the children to stay with you part of the time. It can just be an arrangement between you.
Ali - 15-Sep-17 @ 1:47 PM
Hee - Your Question:
My ex husband is taking me to court for joint custody of our 12 year old on we have split up 12 years ago and my son has lived with me for 12 years and his 9 year old half sister my son doesn't want to live with him what would happen

Our Response:
It is highly unlikely a court would remove your son from your care as the resident parent unless absolutely necessary. Your son is also now old enough for his own opinion to be taken into consideration by the courts.
ChildSupportLaws - 14-Sep-17 @ 12:39 PM
My ex husband is taking me to court for joint custody of our 12 year old on we have split up 12 years ago and my son has lived with me for 12 years and his 9 year old half sister my son doesn't want to live with him what would happen
Hee - 13-Sep-17 @ 6:56 PM
Help my 13 year old son lives with his mum 170 miles away she is controlling and emotionally abusive and I have witnessed via Facebook video chat today her pushing my son forcefully just because he didn't want to get something from his half sisters bedroom his half sister then went and told there mum and she decided that was a good enough reason to take his Xbox and knock his TV to the floor and push him multiple times I have just received a Facebook message saying he wants to live with myself and my partner but the message dose not sound like one he would sent as he spells cuz and not because his mum is very good at pretending everything is good as I have called social services a few times and been told everything is fine many things have happened but without any proof where do I stand and what can I do please help thank you
Wesley - 11-Sep-17 @ 9:15 PM
Hi, my ex partner who is currently looking for somebody where to live is saying he will take the kids as I suffer from depression and "cannot look after myself or my children" my home may not be show home standard but it's always tidy. The children are feed (though if you ask him there is never anything in) whereas he smokes cannabis every night. Can he take my kids
Kirsty - 9-Sep-17 @ 6:35 PM
advise recently my stepdaughter was admitted to hospital short term and is now back at her address whilst in hospital she and us her parents filled out forms for joint custody arrangement which we both wanted and still want however the papers have come back from the court after we paid and they cashed cheque saying we can't do this as children do not live with us! the grandparents as the children can't live at 2 addresses at same time am a little confused by this response my stepdaughter does have full custody of our grandchildren and the father only has visitation rights
mr p - 8-Sep-17 @ 6:37 PM
Annie - Your Question:
My ex and I split a year ago and he was having regular contact with not children (1 from a previous relationship) he has every other weekend and 1 night in the week. He has since stopped all contact with my daughter who calls him dad, he recently applied to court for full custody of our son dispite me being his main care giver his entire life while my ex was out working 12 hour days and when he weren't working out fishing with his friends spending a minimal amount of time at home. He states I'm physically abuse to my children altho due to a incident involving my son drinking oven cleaner ( all safety precautions were in place I.e cupboard locks, safety gates etc) a week before Christmas 2016 a multi agency investigation took place with not concerns over my peranting. It even states in the reports he has no concerns nor does any other parties I.e school health visitors. I received the court summons and it's all lies.he states I abused him in order to get out of mediation, caffcass have been ordered by the court to contact me. He has the best solicitor and I have to represent myself, all these are lies and have already been proven false after a neighbourly despite ended with her making false reports to the nspcc on numerous occasions. What are the chances of him winning? my son has health issues and needs full time care my ex recently give up his job in order to support he application to court, will the judge separate siblings?

Our Response:
It is highly unlikely the court would separate siblings. Otake a child from one parent and hand the child to another parent unless there is a very good 'proven' reason why this would be in the child's best interests.
ChildSupportLaws - 7-Sep-17 @ 2:42 PM
My ex and I split a year ago and he was having regular contact with not children (1 from a previous relationship) he has every other weekend and 1 night in the week. He has since stopped all contact with my daughter who calls him dad, he recently applied to court for full custody of our son dispite me being his main care giver his entire life while my ex was out working 12 hour days and when he weren't working out fishing with his friends spending a minimal amount of time at home. He states I'm physically abuse to my children altho due to a incident involving my son drinking oven cleaner ( all safety precautions were in place I.e cupboard locks, safety gates etc) a week before Christmas 2016 a multi agency investigation took place with not concerns over my peranting. It even states in the reports he has no concerns nor does any other parties I.e school health visitors. I received the court summons and it's all lies..he states I abused him in order to get out of mediation, caffcass have been ordered by the court to contact me. He has the best solicitor and I have to represent myself, all these are lies and have already been proven false after a neighbourly despite ended with her making false reports to the nspcc on numerous occasions. What are the chances of him winning? my son has health issues and needs full time care my ex recently give up his job in order to support he application to court, will the judge separate siblings?
Annie - 6-Sep-17 @ 8:07 PM
Suz - Your Question:
What rights do children have when their parents are divorced? My niece is 13 years old and her parents have joint custody. She lives with her mother and spends alternate weekends with her father and his new family. She turned up on the doorstep last weekend with 2 begs of clothes stating that she'd had an argument with her mum who subsequently 'threw her out'. She stayed with her father for 2 weeks, her mother then turned up and demanded that she return. My niece would like to live with her father but her mother is refusing. What rights does my niece have? At what age can she decide where and who she lives with.

Our Response:
If the father has parental responsibility of his child, then where both parents have parental responsibility and one parent is keeping the children against the other's wishes, the police cannot help, even if the children do not normally live with them, this is the remit of the courts. Therefore, if your niece refuses to go home and remains living with her father, the mother would then have to apply to court for a child arrangement order which will determine where your niece will live. As your niece is now 13, her opinion will be taken into consideration. However, as in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the child in question. The court will always put the child’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order. A court will generally always aim for consistency and only where it feels it is in the child's best interests will the court opt to move the child from one parent to another. However, if the parent does not have parental responsibility, the police will be able to intervene and return the child back to the resident parent. On another note, it is always best to mutually resolve these issues before the matter gets to court. If the parents can't agree between them, mediation may be an option here.
ChildSupportLaws - 4-Sep-17 @ 1:53 PM
Bob mayo- Your Question:
Me and my wife have been spilt up for about 18 months. We slept with Each other over the last 7 months but in July she told everyone that she was in a new relationship for 8 to 9 months and thought it was OK to let her new boyfriend meet our kids after telling me that she was in a relationship for only 2 weeks.We have the kids every other weekend and Tuesday Wednesday Thursday but she thinks it's OK to have the kids every Monday so she gets to see the kids for 8 straight days. She has moved the new boyfriend in and the kids don't like him and they have told there mother this. This new boyfriend has just got out of prison and nobody has told me why so I don't know if he is a good person to be around my kids.The kids hide when it's time for them to go to hers and they have both said they want to live with me. She never takes them out or does anything with them. She can't afford to buy them new clothes and she is always running out of food or electricity/gas. I just feel the kids would be better off with me

Our Response:
In situations such as this, if you cannot resolve these issues directly with your ex, then you would need to suggest mediation and if your ex refuses to attend mediation, the last resort is court. You don't say how old your kids are, but if the matter goes to court Cafcass would get involved. Cafcass interview both parents in the case, as well as the children, and any others who might be needed, which could mean social workers, medical professionals, or even relatives. From the interviews they conduct, the Cafcass reporter will analyse the situation from the evidence and statements received and write a report. It’s a measure of how important the Cafcass recommendation is that the court will almost invariably adhere to it. However, there always has to be a very good reason for the court to take children from one parent and hand them to another. As in all cases, the court’s main concern is the welfare of the children in question. The court will always put the children’s best interests first and this main issue will determine the outcome of any application for an order.
ChildSupportLaws - 4-Sep-17 @ 12:05 PM
What rights do children have when their parents are divorced? My niece is 13 years old and her parents have joint custody. She lives with her mother and spends alternate weekends with her father and his new family. She turned up on the doorstep last weekend with 2 begs of clothes stating that she'd had an argument with her mum who subsequently 'threw her out'. She stayed with her father for 2 weeks, her mother then turned up and demanded that she return. My niece would like to live with her father but her mother is refusing. What rights does my niece have? At what age can she decide where and who she lives with.
Suz - 3-Sep-17 @ 6:48 PM
Me and my wife have been spilt up for about 18 months. We slept with Each other over the last 7 months but in July she told everyone that she was in a new relationship for 8 to 9 months and thought it was OK to let her new boyfriend meet our kids after telling me that she was in a relationship for only 2 weeks.We have the kids every other weekend and Tuesday Wednesday Thursday but she thinks it's OK to have the kids every Monday so she gets to see the kids for 8 straight days. She has moved the new boyfriend in and the kids don't like him and they have told there mother this. This new boyfriend has just got out of prison and nobody has told me why so I don't know if he is a good person to be around my kids.The kids hide when it's time for them to go to hers and they have both said they want to live with me. She never takes them out or does anything with them. She can't afford to buy them new clothes and she is always running out of food or electricity/gas. I just feel the kids would be better off with me
Bob - 3-Sep-17 @ 10:33 AM
Hi me and my ex are separeted since i was pregnant but during the pregnancy we were living in the same house,he was on a relation with my hest friend,having a affair in our house,he make my life hell during the pregnancy,never give any money,hr left when my baby was 5 weeks,left me with nothing,i lost the house,struggling finnancial with a new born baby and child with 10 years,the last 21 months je didint came see the baby many times,my baby is almost 2 years old and doenst recognize him as father,but now he want take him om the morning and bring him at night. I dont want my son near that woman,even is the father he never changed a nappie,never came to see him if was not well,never help with anything. Waht should i do???the court will allow him to take mybaby???
Cris - 2-Sep-17 @ 12:55 AM
Becky - Your Question:
Hi, my ex husband and I split 2 years ago and agreed on joint custody, although his mum actually does the morning and afternoon school run and Thurs and Fridays. She is very emotional and blames me for the split even though he has just had twins with his new partner. They argue a lot and my ex inlaws argue a lot and myself and my partner have created a lovely stable, family home. I am now in a position to do all the school pick ups myself which is narrowing the kids homes to 2 and not 3(not my choice) my ex works and is not able to pick up so gran does it. She now sees herself as the 3rd parent and is emotionally unstable crying most days about myself and my ex split to the children. I have put this to him and said for them to still stay at his on the normal nights but I will pick them up from school. Bouncing from 3 homes isnt right for the kids and I would like to limit that now that I am able to. Do I have any weight my side as he had sent a msg saying this is a bad idea and I will break his mothers heart so I feel I am still being controlled by him and them

Our Response:
If you both have shared care of your children, then it is up to your ex to decide how he wishes to care for/ organise the children based upon what he thinks is in their best interests in his allotted time, as presumably do you. It is understandable your ex's mother wishes to have a close relationship with her grandchildren, as most grandparents do whether maternal or paternal. If you consider you both to have an equal share of caring for your children, then you also need to relinquish some control and leave some decisions to his better judgement. Putting your kids first is always important in cases such as this. If your kids like spending time with their grandmother despite whether you wholly approve of her methods or not, should be taken into consideration. In cases where you cannot agree between you, then mediation should be the next port of call.
ChildSupportLaws - 31-Aug-17 @ 3:25 PM
Hi, my ex husband and I split 2 years ago and agreed on joint custody, although his mum actually does the morning and afternoon school run and Thurs and Fridays. She is very emotional and blames me for the split even though he has just had twins with his new partner. They argue a lot and my ex inlaws argue a lot and myself and my partner have created a lovely stable, family home. I am now in a position to do all the school pick ups myself which is narrowing the kids homes to 2 and not 3(not my choice) my ex works and is not able to pick up so gran does it. She now sees herself as the 3rd parent and is emotionally unstable crying most days about myself and my ex split to the children. I have put this to him and said for them to still stay at his on the normal nights but I will pick them up from school. Bouncing from 3 homes isnt right for the kids and I would like to limit that now that I am able to. Do I have any weight my side as he had sent a msg saying this is a bad idea and I will break his mothers heart so I feel I am still being controlled by him and them
Becky - 30-Aug-17 @ 10:49 PM
Th123 - Your Question:
Hi me and my ex half been split over a year now and are struggling to come to an agreement about when he can see our son. About 6 month ago he started a shift job of 4days in 4 days off we have tried for him to have him mainly on the weekend he is off and occasionally on a few days in the week when he is off. For me this is to sporadic and there is no structure to the arrangement I have noticed my son is alot more emotional and occasionally violent when he comes home. My son is only 2 and I feel like structure is a key component to his life at the minute so I have suggested a set day/sleep over at weekend to provide structure. The ex says he can not do this because of work a 2 year old does not need a routine and it's not fair on him. I don't really know where I stand as I know he's going to throw the court card at me. Any advice is appreciated.

Our Response:
If and where you cannot agree, mediation has to be considered before any application to court will be allowed, please see link here .
ChildSupportLaws - 21-Aug-17 @ 3:06 PM
Wudi78 - Your Question:
Me and my partner has been split for three years we had a good custody agreement which a year later changed because of his work commitments so he dropped time from our son.for me to find out he doesnt work them days but failed to tell me. he is constantly wanting to swap weekends round not giving me a choice to say yes as ge will just not turn up for him.and not even reslly making the time up that is lost. my question is how do I take this matter to mediation or court as I need something set in stone even though hes doesn't deserve him for my son as it tolls on him as ge does want to see his dad and does always cry when he has to come home. My ex always thinks its because he doesnt like to come home I saud its because hes no sooner going hes coming home and wants to see him more. Gets me mad how they is laws that stops a mother from letting a father see hes children yet they is no law that makes them see them any advice would be appreciated as I cant take no more of it

Our Response:
You can arrange family mediation via the link here. Neither you or your ex can apply to court without considering/exploring mediation first. Mediation is a formal negotiation and courts can accept the agreement of the mediation instead of having to go through the court process, although it is subject to final court approval. I hope this helps.
ChildSupportLaws - 21-Aug-17 @ 1:53 PM
Hi me and my ex half been split over a year now and are struggling to come to an agreement about when he can see our son. About 6 month ago he started a shift job of 4days in 4 days off we have tried for him to have him mainly on the weekend he is off and occasionally on a few days in the week when he is off. For me this is to sporadic and there is no structure to the arrangement I have noticed my son is alot more emotional and occasionally violent when he comes home. My son is only 2 and I feel like structure is a key component to his life at the minute so I have suggested a set day/sleep over at weekend to provide structure. The ex says he can not do this because of work a 2 year old does not need a routine and it's not fair on him. I don't really know where I stand as I know he's going to throw the court card at me. Any advice is appreciated.
Th123 - 20-Aug-17 @ 10:24 PM
Me and my partner has been split for three years we had a good custody agreement which a year later changed because of his work commitments so he dropped time from our son..for me to find out he doesnt work them days but failed to tell me.. he is constantly wanting to swap weekends round not giving me a choice to say yes as ge will just not turn up for him...and not even reslly making the time up that is lost.. my question is how do i take this matter to mediation or court as i need something set in stone even though hes doesn't deserve him for my son as it tolls on him as ge does want to see his dad and does always cry when he has to come home. My ex always thinks its because he doesnt like to come home i saud its because hes no sooner going hes coming home and wants to see him more. Gets me mad how they is laws that stops a mother from letting a father see hes children yet they is no law that makes them see them any advice would be appreciated as i cant take no more of it
Wudi78 - 20-Aug-17 @ 11:18 AM
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